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Can a Titanium Ring Be Cut Off?

posted by admin at 08/14/2018
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There are a lot of myths and legends concerning this topic so I will try to put the record straight.

Titanium is a material that is not particularly hard but is very strong and has a high tensile strength. Many people are unsure as to the difference between hardness and tensile strength and often get them confused. Let us consider diamond, the hardest material currently known to man.

If you had a rod of diamond that was 25mm in diameter and 1 metre long, you wouldn’t easily scratch it or mark it but if you try to bend it over your knee, you would probably find that it would snap like a carrot. Titanium on the other hand is relatively soft in as much as it can be easily cut and marked, but has a high tensile strength which means that if you put it over your knee and had the strength to bend it, it would bend without breaking.

Tensile strength, in a nutshell, is resistance of a material to pulling force before it shears or pulls apart. Paper has low tensile strength, cake has very low tensile strength and Titanium and Titanium alloys have high tensile strength.

On a side note, an alloy, for those of you that don’t know, is a combination of different materials. For example Aircraft grade Titanium (Grade 5 or Ti/6Al/4V) is an alloy of 90% Titanium, 6% Aluminium and 4% Vanadium and has higher tensile strength than Grade 2 CP Titanium which is not an alloy but the element in its pure form.

Getting back to the original question, ‘Titanium Ring Removal – Can Titanium rings be removed in an emergency?’.

The simple answer is ‘yes they can’ and the process is exactly the same as for precious metal ring removal utilising the same tools.

Quite probably the main consideration when cutting off a Titanium ring is that the blade is brand new or very little used and preferably Tungsten Carbide.

A dull blade will struggle to cut the ring and will heat up the ring quite quickly. Lubrication is quite important too.

Join Odissa Republic!

posted by admin at 08/10/2018
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Join Odissa Republic!

Feel free to join our Facebook group, Odissa Republic, where you can meet the designers first hand, ask questions or even get help commissioning your own pieces.

 

Odissa Republic on Facebook

PRODUCT PHOTOGRAPHY TIPS

posted by admin at 08/09/2018
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An Image is Worth a Thousand Words (And Maybe a Thousand Sales!)

Accurate representation of your product is essential, customers need to be able to learn as much about your product as they possibly can before they can make a decision about whether or not to buy it.

The way you present your products online has a significant impact on sales. Taking great photographs of your jewellery is an essential skill when showcasing handmade designs for your online shop presence or entering competitions etc.

The main product or catalogue shots look better where possible with a white background and, optionally, the addition of a drop shadow (pay attention to shadows). If well lit, a subtle shadow can add depth and dimension to a shot.

Lighting

Avoid harsh backlighting and other setups that cast shadows on the surface of the object.

product photography tips

Keep the lights on the same side of the object as your camera, or slightly off to one side. Polished silver is notoriously difficult to photograph. The addition of a strategically placed piece of black card in your lightbox that shows as a reflection on the jewellery can be advantageous by adding depth.

They should also be clear with the product in focus, although it can help to draw attention to certain features of the product by making elements of the design out of focus.

Fingerprints or dust on your product produce poor quality results so cleanliness is important.

Be Creative

Showing multiple angles of your product is critical. It is a known fact that showing multiple views of your product will significantly improve your sales.

Additional images showing the products in various lifestyle situations or worn on a model help to sell them and give a sense of physical size.

Show your packaging so the customer can see what to expect when the product arrives.

Small pictures are simply not effective as a sales tool. Images should be square and ideally a minimum of 600 pixels x 600 pixels and a maximum of 1000 pixels x 1000 pixels @ 72dpi for online purposes.

After the Shot! 

A little bit of 'cleaning up' editing is normal, background removal or exposure and levels settings can be undertaken easily with software programmes such as Photoshop or Corel (paid for). Or, as a free alternative, Gimp (downloadable) or Pixlr ( online editing; www.pixlr.com ).

Consistency -  It’s very important that you crop and size all of your jewellery product images in the same way. Multiple crops and sizes will only confuse customers and lessen the professional look of your Odissa shop product range.

 

Spotlight on Breige King

posted by admin at 08/09/2018
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I’m an independent jewellery designer working with gold, silver and precious stones using traditional techniques.

Whilst I enjoy working with newly sourced metal and stones, my true passion is working with a piece of jewellery that has meaning, perhaps a piece left by a loved one, taking it and breathing life back into it.

With any piece I make, the privilege is all mine. It is such an honour when a customer asks me to make them an engagement band, a wedding ring, remodel a piece of jewellery, as if I step outside of my life and straight into theirs.

I love creativity & take inspiration from every thing I see! I’m a really random person when it comes to the bare facts. I love to name my pieces, to give them an identity, to tell a story. Sweet Dreams, this was one of the frequent designs that woke me frantically from sleep, clutching for a pen and paper. La Pelosa, an aquamarine ring named after the clearest, crystal blue sea I’ve ever seen. Little Satsuma, a small but very sweet orange sapphire stacking ring. Something Blue, a modern twist on an engagement ring, set with a striking natural blue diamond, I could go on and on and on.

Every piece is special without a single doubt. Some pieces tug my heart strings more than others. I always cry at sad (and happy) movies and often shed a little tear over a piece of my work. Strangely, given my (fading) red hair it’s rarely to do with temper or anger (though my children and dogs do inherently know when is a good time to ‘not bother’ me and when to ask for those new trainers!)

I hope you get the same immense pleasure from my pieces that I get from creating them!

View Breige King products on Odissa

how do i take a fingerprint?

posted by admin at 08/07/2018
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Fingerprint jewellery

Various fingerprint kits are available to buy online that give excellent results and the clearer the print supplied, the better the laser engraved result on your fingerprint jewellery will be.

Due to the fineness of a child’s print, these are probably the ones that need the greatest attention to detail. Using a good quality, smooth paper can improve the result
and best results, both for children and adults, are usually found using glossy photographic paper.

 

If we determine that the print is unsuitable or requires too much work to make usable, we would have to request that better prints are obtained, or charge extra to clean them up (if possible).

A visual examination of the print before sending to us will save having to resubmit new prints and a lot of time, examples of good and bad prints are shown below.

As a guide though, if it looks like a blob with no defined lines, it probably won’t be any good.

 

EXAMPLES USING DIFFERENT PAPER QUALITIES

 

The image below is an example of an alternative method of obtaining prints that we’re experimenting with – results are looking promising!

One good method of taking a fingerprint for laser engraving.

We used to recommend getting arrested and letting the professionals do it for you, but this method is probably simpler.

Things you’ll need:

Graphite stick available from craft shops (or a pencil) – Sellotape – white paper, preferably glossy white photography paper. Oh! and a finger!

Step 1:

Rub the graphite stick or pencil on a piece of paper to form a block about 25mm – 35mm square – or round, it doesn’t matter.

Step 2:

Rub your finger into the area of graphite, coating it well and enough to cover the area of your finger that you want the print from. (It’s messy but it works!

Step 3:

Roll your finger over the sticky side of the tape to absorb the graphite. You may get 2 or 3 rolls out of it from one application of graphite on your finger.

 

Step 4:

Stick the sellotape down well onto your glossy white paper taking care not to get any air bubbles trapped between the tape and the paper.

Repeat until you’re happy that you have a good quality print that can be scanned and still retains the best detail.

If the print is smudged, it’s no good. You can avoid this by not pressing down as hard on to the Sellotape with your graphited finger.

 

Q? Do I need to send the original print to you or can I scan and email to you?

A:  Scanning and emailing is fine to do.

 

Q? Do you recommend ‘Inkless Fingerprint Kits;?

A:  We’ve tried various methods for obtaining fingerprints and some Inkless fingerprint kits are quite good and have the added advantage of being a lot cleaner. The charcoal method above is cheap, gives very good results and can be done using items from around (most) homes.

 

Q? If I scratch my nose with a charcoal coated finger, is there a chance nobody will tell me I have a smudge on my face and end up looking silly all day?

A:  Yes, without a shadow of a doubt!

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